Chinese Learning Apps for Android Roundup

This post is a follow-up to the New Chinese Learning App Roundup post, but this time we’ll be focusing on apps for Android!

While messing around on my Android phone, I went through and grabbed what seemed like the most useful apps from the Google Play store for Chinese study. Check out the list of apps after the jump!

Continue reading “Chinese Learning Apps for Android Roundup”

SwiftKey for Android Now Supports Chinese!

Every so often I switch the default keyboard just to check out the third party ones. I don’t use them often, but I was happy to see that SwiftKey (one of the first third party keyboards I downloaded) finally supports Chinese input. And, perhaps just in time for Chinese New Year, they’ve also introduced a special theme just for the holiday.

After getting the app, you’ll need to go in and Add Languages. The Chinese input methods are listed by their Chinese names, so you’ll need to scroll all the way down to the bottom of the list to add them.

Screenshot_2015-01-29-17-20-49

The update brings the following support:

Simplified Chinese

  • QWERTY Pinyin input method
  • 12-Key Pinyin input method
  • Stroke input method

Taiwan Traditional Chinese

  • Full Key Zhuyin (Bopomofo) input method
  • 12-Key Zhuyin (Bopomofo) input method
  • Stroke input method

Hong Kong Traditional Chinese

  • Cangjie input method
  • Quick Cangjie input method
  • Stroke input method

I’m still on the fence with third party keyboards, but I think it’s nice to finally see Chinese language support rolling out to them. The typing experience isn’t bad, either, and the predictive text was fairly accurate, too:

Screenshot_2015-01-29-17-22-37

Although it would be nice to see a Pinyin input method for Traditional Chinese, hopefully a future update will bring that along!

You can find SwiftKey on the Google Play store here. If you happen to check it out, let me know what you think of it in the comments below!

Introducing Project Chrono

Coming Soon

Chrono Trigger: perhaps one of my (if not the) all-time favorite RPGs.

Then, a beautiful thing happened one day: SquareEnix released an iOS and an Android version of Chrono Trigger. But, not only that, it included a complete Chinese translation–both in Simplified and Traditional Chinese.

This was simply amazing.

So I decided in a series of posts I will be sharing some fun tidbits from the game and hopefully build up a useless amazing RPG vocabulary set in Chinese! So keep an eye out for those, and feel free to let me know if there’s anything specific you’d like to know from the game!

New Chinese Learning App Roundup!

There’s been quite a few great new apps released for both iOS and Android recently that would make a great addition to any Chinese learner’s toolbox. So in this post I wanted to highlight a few of them and share with everyone to take a look at! I’ve also included screenshots at the very end of the post.

Pinyin Browser152x152

  • Platform: iOS (iPhone, iPad)
  • Free but has in-app purchases
  • Official app website can be found here.

Pinyin Browser is a lovely little browser app that allows you to insert Pinyin or even Zhuyin above the text on any website that has Chinese text. This is a great way to practice pronunciation as you read news, blog posts, and more on the web.

In the free version, you’re limited to what websites you can visit. To get access beyond these trial sites, you need to pay $1.99 to upgrade.

You can find Pinyin Browser for iOS here.

Laowai Pro975318_larger

  • Platform: iOS (iPhone, iPad)
  • Free but offers in-app purchases
  • Official app website can be found here

A relatively lightweight app, Laowai Pro provides a selection of texts for you to read and lookup words as you go. It also has flashcards and an SRS system integrated into it, though I prefer using the app to read. The selection of texts are primarily Chinese Classics and a few news articles. Dream of the Red Mansion is also included.

The app also has the options to switch to Traditional, too. You can pay $1.99 to remove ads and $4.99 to get a stack of 30,000+ flashcards.

You can find Laowai Pro for iOS here.

Mandaread836515_larger

  • Platform iOS (iPhone, iPad); Android coming soon
  • Free but requires account
  • Official app website can be found here.

Some may remember the early stages of the Mandaread website, and while it seemed dormant for a while, they’ve come out with a rather well done app. They have a large variety of texts organized by level (Beginner, Intermediate and Advanced) and offer popups for each vocabulary word in the text. I also appreciate that they have pre-defined courses to get you started.

One downside is that you can’t switch between Traditional and Simplified Chinese, with the app currently only offering the texts in Simplified.

You can get Mandaread for iOS here.

For all the Above..

I’d recommend picking them all up since they’re all free and really good at different things. Plus, the articles in both Laowai Pro and Mandaread are quite different, so you’ll always have interesting and new content to read.

Have you used any of these? Let me know what you think in the comments!

For screenshots of the apps, click below.

Continue reading “New Chinese Learning App Roundup!”

The Skritter Android Beta is Out!

Good news for Skritter users with Android devices–the Skritter Beta for Android is out!

Check out the post below for a few screenshots and brief overview. Also, learn how to get a three-week free trial (instead of the usual one week) to test out the app!

With a cute splash screen to boot!
With a cute splash screen to boot!

Continue reading “The Skritter Android Beta is Out!”

Android, wash up and go to sleep! Android 可以洗洗睡了

I came across this phrase in the title of an article from TechOrange (a super great Chinese language tech news website by the way. You should bookmark it now!).

洗洗睡(xǐxǐshuì)is a fun Chinese internet slang term, which means something like “wash up and get to bed” or “don’t waste your energy”. Check out the article and see why they think Android no longer has a lead on iOS.

In case you were curious, to describe this meaning in Chinese it would be:「洗澡(洗臉)刷牙睡覺去吧」(“wash up and get to bed”) -or-「不要白費力氣了」(“don’t waste your energy”)

Now whether or not what the article says is true, well, I guess we’ll find out this fall!