Chinese<—>Chinese Online Dictionaries

Just a few links for my (and potentially your) reference for some online Chinese to Chinese dictionaries. The links are in increasing order of difficulty (e.g. Children’s Concise, to Children’s, to regular [with a lot of literary references to some entries; really interesting!], idioms, and character variants).

Kids Mini (GREAT place to start!):

http://140.111.1.43/cgi-bin/gdic/gsweb.cgi?o=ddictionary

Kids:

http://140.111.34.46/jdict/main/cover/main.htm

Regular dictionary:

http://140.111.34.46/newDict/dict/index.html

Idioms:

http://dict.idioms.moe.edu.tw/

Chinese Character Variants:

http://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/

Hope they’re helpful!

Daily Sentences

The "Daily Sentence" at the bottom of the page here [http://www.104learn.com.tw/language.htm] is a great way to get authentic Chinese sentences–and useful ones too; many you wouldn’t find in a normal textbook. What do I mean? They aren’t simplified down for FOREIGN readers, they’re written for NATIVE speakers and are a much better source for authentic Chinese sentences (to repeat myself).

Examples:

How,s it going? 近來如何?
Great! 很不錯!

How much does this cost? 這個值多少錢?
Sixty dollars. 六十元。

Excuse me. May I come in 抱歉,我可以進來嗎?
Sure. Come on in. 當然可以。進來吧。

Some of it may sounds very “dictionary”, but, hey, that just means when you’re using a Chinese to Chinese dictionary (which you should) it’ll be a lot easier.

And, if nothing else, the more sentences, the more variety, the more adaptive your language will be, like the Borg in Star Trek, which made them all the more intimidating. Be the Borg in Chinese (or whatever language you want to be).

How to be incredibly cheap and still make a good meal in Taiwan

I know, I know. Well, maybe you don’t know, but in Taiwan, food prices are pretty darned cheap. As well as the availability and variety are practically overwhelming. And yet, I (being me, who tends to be a cheapo) am always in search of finding ways to further economize. Today’s special: Beef Instant Noodles with a Hot Springs Boiled Egg and a healthy bottle of green tea to accompany it.

First, we stop by our friendly local 7-11 (they’re all local since there’s a billion of them, and half of them are across the street from each other). Grab our ingredients: the instant noodles, the egg, and the drink.

Instant noodles: 48NT (~1.50)
Hot Springs Egg: 16NT (~0.50)
Drink: 25NT (~0.80)

So, all together it’s a clean 89NT, or about $2.87 US. Let’s get started!

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Staring at a glass of tea

Taking a break from my studies I sit back in my chair, raise my cup of tea to drink. Instead of lowering my head and thinking of home, I raise it to look out at a teahouse situated at the top of a mountain. There, I picture myself reading the Classics, drinking tea or playing Chinese Chess with a close friend, while enjoying the vivid colors and the scenery below. This is my ideal studying environment, where I can enjoy nature and the wilderness.

The future and the past are inextricably linked, the best we can do is enjoy the ride and talk about it along the way.

Come along and share some thoughts, ideas, and the fun of traveling through language learning and international experiences.